Health Care Industry Careers – Still Growing Strong

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Health care careers are still growing at an impressive pace despite the current economic climate. According to the United States Bureau of Labor Statistics-BLS-health care will generate 2.4 million new jobs by 2018. It is for this reason many individuals regard the field of health care a recession-proof industry. Those who are interested in pursuing employment in this field may wish to consider the following careers:

Nursing

Registered nurses work in a variety of medical settings caring for patients who are physically or mentally ill. Once a person has obtained a degree in nursing, he or she will find there are many employment options from which to choose. Positions can be found in hospitals, nursing homes, emergency clinics, doctor’s offices, schools, state hospitals, dialysis centers or rehabilitation facilities. Regardless of where an individual with a nursing degree chooses to work, he or she will find that making a difference in the lives of other people is a richly rewarding occupation. Those interested in the field of nursing will also be pleased to discover that registered nurses earn an average annual wage of $65,000, according to the BLS.

Dental Hygienist

Another fine option for those who have a health care degree is a career as a dental hygienist. A dental hygienist works under the supervision of a dentist or oral surgeon where he or she assists with taking x-rays, creating patient history files, assisting with dental procedures, and educating patients regarding proper dental hygiene. Dental hygienists enjoy salaries similar to that of registered nurses and as a continual need for dental care is always present, job security is not typically a cause for concern for those in such positions. Although every state has different requirements for dental hygienists, most states require that a person have a minimum of an associates level degree in dental hygiene before he or she is allowed to practice.

Paramedics and Emergency Medical Technicians

There is a continual need for paramedics and emergency medical technicians-EMTs-in the United States. In most areas of the country, paramedics are required to possess an associates degree, as well as complete a specific number of clinical hours out on the field under the supervision of an experienced paramedic. Paramedics and EMTs can expect to earn a starting salary of approximately $38,980 according to reports posted on Payscale’s Website. Saving lives while earning a good salary make such positions attractive to individuals who hold a health care degree.

Medical Assistants

Working as a medical assistant may involve anything from reception work in a doctor’s office to performing basic clinical tasks in an examination room. Training for such a position involves learning clerical and clinical duties, accounting, record keeping, and medical terminology. According to the BLS, medical assistants in 2009 earned a mean annual wage of $32,060, making it a practical choice for those who wish to break into the field of health care.

Each person must decide which career in the health care industry is most appropriate for him or her. It is wise for one to explore several job options, particularly those that offer the greatest opportunity for advancement, before making a final decision. However, regardless of which type of employment a person chooses, he or she will likely experience good job security and fulfilling work upon entering the field of health care.



Source by James E Wright

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